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Please note that there will be a delay in responding to reports submitted during the bank holiday weekend. Reports will be responded to as soon as possible from Tuesday 28th May.

Students can find information about alternative support here.

Staff members can access support through the Employee Assistance Programme.

If you have a safeguarding concern during this time, or need help now, please see the 'I need help now' page.

Bullying is never okay. It can be difficult to understand what it is unless you’ve experienced or witnessed it. Here are some helpful definitions:

Bullying

Bullying is offensive, intimidating, malicious or insulting behaviour, an abuse or misuse of power through means intended to undermine, humiliate, denigrate or injure the recipient (it could take place online or offline).

Bullying can take the form of physical, verbal and non-verbal conduct. Non-verbal conduct includes postings on social media outlets. Bullying may include:

  • shouting at, being sarcastic towards, ridiculing or demeaning others
  • physical or psychological threats
  • overbearing and intimidating levels of supervision
  • inappropriate and/or derogatory remarks about someone's performance
  • abuse of authority or power by those in positions of seniority
  • deliberately excluding someone from meetings or communications without good reason
Harassment

Harassment is unwanted conduct affecting the dignity of people in the work or study place. Unwanted conduct may be related to age, sex, race, disability, religion or belief, sexual orientation, nationality or any personal characteristic of the individual, and may be persistent or an isolated incident. The key is that the actions or comments are viewed as demeaning and unacceptable to the recipient. 

Harassment may include:
  • unwanted physical conduct or ‘horseplay’, including touching, pinching, pushing, grabbing, brushing past someone, invading their personal space and more serious forms of physical or sexual assault
  • offensive or intimidating comments or gestures, or insensitive jokes or pranks
  • mocking, mimicking or belittling a person’s disability
  • racist, sexist, homophobic or ageist jokes
  • outing or threatening to out someone as gay, lesbian, bisexual or trans
  • ignoring or shunning someone, for example, by deliberately excluding them from a conversation or a social activity.
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